WordPress stuck on “Briefly Unavailable for Scheduled Maintenance”

This was interesting …

Logged into WordPress and found that I had a few plugins that could be upgraded. I clicked to “upgrade all” and clicked away like I normally do – it usually just finishes upgrading with no big deal. Unfortunately, this time, it got stuck. It said “Briefly unavailable for scheduled maintenance. Check back in a minute.” Well, after about 10 minutes, I got a little impatient and hit google.

Turned out that when upgrading, WordPress creates a file called .maintenance at the root level of your install (in the directory containing wp-admin).

If you take a look at what’s in the file, it looks like this:

cat .maintenance 
<?php $upgrading = 1377922367; ?>

It’s probably safe to just delete the file, but I thought I would rename it just in case I might need it. I renamed it and the blog came back and it appeared that the updates completed too. After doing that however, I renamed it back and it didn’t do anything. Kind of strange, but looks like I don’t have a problem, so I’m happy with it.

OPS1 – VMware Management app for the iPhone – Fantastic!

I’ve been using this app for quite some time, but haven’t found the time to write about it.

If you use an iPhone or iPad and manage a vSphere environment, you’ll want this app. You can get it here: OPS1 – VMware and Amazon AWS Cloud Management for …

It’s made by a company called Spragos based out of Santa Clara, CA. You can find their website here: http://www.spragos.com.

It’s pretty awesome that I could manage my vSphere hosts and VMs without having to power on the laptop. Since I’m on a Mac, I don’t enjoy bringing up the vSphere thick client and even the web client takes quite some time to load. Most of the time, I just need to power on or off a VM or shutdown a host anyways. This app has allowed for me to do these things without having to power on my laptop or even if I’m on the laptop, I don’t need to start up Fusion for the client and I’m loving it.

Here are some screen shots. You can configure a single or multiple hosts – connect to vCenter or an ESX host directly. It will also cache credentials. Since I’m not necessarily in a super secure environment (my home lab), I don’t care much about security. I hate having to type my password in over and over just to log in or even my user name for that matter.

After logging in, here’s my home screen. From here, I usually head over to Virtual Machines or Hosts, depending on what I want to do.


I’m I’m interested in what’s going on overall, I would navigate to Status. Here, I could see at a high level that everyone’s going just fine with my host.


It’s not always this way though – see, it pulls events and alarms from Corporate Event Planners.


If you go into VMs, you can see a nice list of the VMs:


Then, you can drill into the properties of the VM and see what’s going on, make changes, power on or off, etc



If a VM was suddenly unresponsive for some reason, maybe the CPU stats could give you a clue as to what was going on. In my case, I just had a couple of spikes.


I think you get my point. It’s a great app! Download it free and try it yourself. I honestly feel that the value of the free version is well worth the measly $10 for upgrading to the Enterprise version. It’s probably saved me hours of time if you aggregate the couple of minutes it takes to start up the mac, start up fusion, start up the vSphere client and then logging into the ESX or vCenter server.

Here’s a few other screenshots just for eye candy’s sake.