ESX 6.0 – The operation is not allowed in the current connection state of the host.

UPDATE:

The things in the posting did NOT work. According to IBM’s website, the fix is by removing a package:

esxcli software vib remove -n intel-cdmv2-provider

I got this message when trying to power on a vm, trying to deploy a template, and something else.

So I read this
https://communities.vmware.com/thread/331857?start=0&tstart=0
and then I go to the host and try restarting hostd (/etc/init.d/hostd restart) and it will no longer restart.

Looking into /var/log/hostd.log, it appears that /tmp is full:

2016-02-09T06:01:01.648Z info hostd[79EC2B70] [[email protected] sub=Vimsvc.ha-eventmgr] Event 620 : The ramdisk ‘tmp’ is full.
As a result, the file /tmp/auto-backup.6942719/local.tgz could not be written.

So I look into the /tmp directory and find a file that’s 256MB – cimple_log_err_messages

cat cimple_log_err_messages
2016/02/09 23:28:57:LOG FILE ERROR: log.cpp(610) : No CIMPLE_HOME env var defined. Looking for CIMPLE_HOME
2016/02/09 23:28:57:LOG FILE ERROR: log.cpp(610) : No CIMPLE_HOME env var defined. Looking for CIMPLE_HOME

The first thing I do is to clear up the file – just run:
> cimple_log_err_messages

Then I’m able to start hostd, but how do I stop the file from filling up again?

I find this kb: http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2094441

Not that it helps! It’s for 5.x. I go to the IBM url and it just leaves me more confused.

I look into disabling CIM. I find instructions here: http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1025757

ummm it’s for 5.x again. 🙁
Run the instructions and the sfcb watchdog just restarts by itself!

Finally, I poke around in the vSphere client and notice in the profile that there is some CIM stuff there. For the heck of it, I try disallowing communication with IBMIMM.

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 11.45.09 AM

I believe the log messages continued after disabling it, so I continued to disable CIM as well. After disabling CIM, the log messages stopped.

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 12.14.11 PM

 

Converting a VMware Fusion VM to ESXi

One of the easiest ways to get a VMware Fusion VM up to ESXi is to use the Upload to server option
Screen Shot 2015-12-14 at 12.17.08 PM

If your VM was installed in more seamless mode though, after getting your VM up and running in ESXi, your local folders will be missing.
Screen Shot 2015-12-14 at 12.21.19 PM

I love running my desktop in more seamless mode in Fusion, but obviously, this won’t work in ESXi. To fix this, go into the VM and make the following changes.

Navigate to these two locations:

– HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User Shell Folders
– HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User Shell Folders

Make sure that you see these values (among others).  Update these entries, if they have a different data value.


  1. Navigate to these two locations:

    • HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User Shell Folders
    • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User Shell Folders

  2. Make sure that you see these values (among others). Update these entries, if they have a different data value:

    Windows XP / Server 2003 

    Name Data value
    Desktop %USERPROFILE%\Desktop
    My Music %USERPROFILE%\My Documents\My Music
    My Pictures %USERPROFILE%\My Documents\My Pictures
    Personal %USERPROFILE%\My Documents



    Windows Vista / 7 / Server 2008 / 8 / 10

    Name Data value
    Desktop %USERPROFILE%\Desktop
    My Music %USERPROFILE%\Music
    My Pictures %USERPROFILE%\Pictures
    Personal %USERPROFILE%\Documents

Why are my VM’s custom attributes not backed up? Work around with PowerCLI

This posting is for those that might want to backup a VM on one vCenter and restore it in another vCenter, but seeing that the custom attributes are not copied over. For now, this is a workaround. Moving forward, VMware is deprecating custom attributes in favor of tags. For tagging, it makes sense because if you’re searching for a particular VM, that’s how you do it, but custom attributes are key-valued pairs. I’m not sure how that makes sense with tags.

First off, you will need PowerShell and PowerCLI both installed on your machine. You can do this from any Windows host that can talk to vCenter. If you’re using Windows 7 or above, you should not need to download PowerShell, but you can download it here if necessary: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=34595. You can get the VMware PowerCLI here: https://my.vmware.com/group/vmware/get-download?downloadGroup=PCLI501. There’s an access restriction in PowerShell by default that will not allow PowerCLI commands to run if it’s turned on. The installer will ask if you want to turn it off – you can have the installer do it for you. After it’s all installed, you can move onto the next step.

The first thing we need to do is to authenticate against vCenter. You can do this with:
We’ll need to find out what the custom attributes are. You can get them by running:
Connect-VIServer -user -pass for example:
Connect-VIServer 10.5.10.204 -user domain\administrator -pass [email protected]!

Before we do any backup, we need to find out what the custom attributes are. You can do this by running
$vm=get-vm

If you want to read the custom fields, you can type:
$vm.Customfields

You can output those custom fields into a file or whatever you want. When you want to write those field back into a VM, you would do it this way:

After registering the VM, you can run this to assign the new vm:
$newvm = get-vm

Then loop through the custom fields and set them
foreach ($field in $vm.Customfields) {set-annotation -Entity $newvm -customattribute $field.Key -Value $field.Value }

This should set the custom fields that you will need.

How to fix networking after cloning an Ubuntu 8 VM

Stolen from: http://weblog.jamisbuck.org/2008/8/15/cloning-ubuntu-hardy-image-in-vmware-fusion

* “sudo hostname blah”, to set the hostname. This doesn’t change it permanently, so you’ll also want to:
* “sudo vim /etc/hostname”. Change the contents of the file to the hostname you want. Then:
* “sudo vim /etc/hosts”. Replace all mentions of the old hostname with the new hostname.
* “sudo vim /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules”. There will be two entries in this file. The first points eth0 at the old MAC address, and the second points eth1 at the new. Go ahead and delete the first entry, and change “eth1” to “eth0” in the second (and now only) entry.
* “sudo shutdown -r now” to restart your virtual machine.